Florida Updates Breach Law

-Effective July 1, 2014-

 On June 20, 2014, Florida Governor Rick Scott signed into law the Florida Information Protection Act of 2014. The legislation beefs up the definition of what will trigger a notification response. The definition of personal information is now defined as an individual’s first name, first initial and last name, or any middle name and last name, in combination with any one or more of these data elements:

-SSN

-DL number or ID number, passport number, military ID number or other similar number issued on a government document

-Financial account number or credit/debit card number in combination with security/access code or password

-Any information regarding a person’s medical history, mental/physical condition or treatment/diagnosis

-Health insurance policy number or subscriber number

-User name or email address, in combination with a password or security question (that would permit access)

The law requires notification following a breach “without unreasonable delay,” and no later than 30 days following the determination of a breach (with certain exceptions). If the notification affects more than 1,000 persons at a single time, notice must also be given to consumer reporting agencies. The act now uses the definition “covered entity” to describe the organizations impacted; covered entity includes a sole proprietorship, partnership, corporation, trust, estate, cooperative, association or other commercial entity that acquires, maintains, stores, or uses personal information. (For certain purposes, this includes governmental entities). The act addresses customer records and data (electronic format). Notice is to be provided to the Department of Legal Affairs of any breach affecting 500 or more individuals, no later than 30 days after the determination of a breach (or reason to believe there was a breach).

In addition to describing the incident and who was affected, the reporting entity must include a police or incident report or computer forensics report, a copy of policies in place regarding breaches, and steps taken to rectify the breach.

The law provides quite a few more rigorous requirements involving security and how entities are to provide a breach response. The Attorney General “thanked” the Governor for enacting the law quoting other legislators who commented that the act “will better protect the confidential personal information of Floridians and hold accountable those who attempt to compromise the security of that information.” The AG notes that the law also requires covered entities “to take reasonable measures to protect Floridians’ personal information and [to] properly dispose of customer records.”

See text at:

http://www.flsenate.gov/Session/Bill/2014/1524

See also commentary about why this law could be model for a comprehensive federal law (reasonable data protection; secure disposal; unauthorized access triggers notification; scale of notification requirements; PII includes medical history, insurance ID; 30-day notification deadline; documentation of investigation; schedule for penalties).

http://www.idt911.com/KnowledgeCenter/NewsRoom/NewsRoomDetail.aspx?a=6E04A83A-6EE4-4806-AA26-6623B82FAB65

 

 

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Brazil’s SPI: 45.2…Whatever That Means

Nate Silver’s Five Thirty Eight blog is featuring an algorithm versus the marketplace bracket mechanism.  While Brazil is heavily favored to win the World Cup, FiveThirtyEight favors them even more than the betting shops — based on “real math.”  Nate describes the system as such:

Today we’re launching an interactive that calculates every team’s chances of advancing past the group stage and eventually winning the tournament. The forecasts are based on the Soccer Power Index (SPI), an algorithm I developed in conjunction with ESPN in 2010. SPI has Brazil as the heavy favorite, with a 45 percent chance of winning the World Cup, well ahead of Argentina (13 percent), Germany (11 percent) and Spain (8 percent).

The overwhelming factor in this scoring is Brazil’s dominance at home.

Also, relative good news for Team USA — the betting line has them at a .3% chance of winning the World Cup while FiveThirtyEight’s SPI has them at .4%.

Good luck #USMNT – indeed!

Go to:

http://fivethirtyeight.com/features/its-brazils-world-cup-to-lose/

And:

http://www.ussoccer.com/stories/2014/06/09/19/44/140609-mnt-travel-to-brazil-feature

And, just in time, Symantec releases its 96-page report: “Latin American + Caribbean Cyber Security Trends.”  The report includes individual country reports, which provides details on government capabilities for dealing with cyber security and cybercrime, including any relevant statistics released by the governing authorities regarding sectors affected by cybercrime.  Symantec likewise provides some quick country stats, for example:

Brazil:

Population: 201,033,000

Internet Penetration: 49.8%

Fixed Broadband Subscribers: 9.2%

And, Symantec, along with its co-sponsor, Organization of American States, sounds the alarm bell for scams and potential vulnerabilities in relation to the World Cup.  From the report:

The 2014 FIFA World Cup in Brazil is expected to be one of the largest sporting events of this century.  While the world comes together to celebrate and compete in sport, cybercriminals have unfortunately identified vulnerabilities and may be plotting attacks against critical infrastructure.  In fact, members of international hacking groups such as Anonymous have recently made threats against official websites operated by FIFA, the Brazilian Government and corporate sponsors of the games.

Several malware operations, phishing attacks, and email scams linked to the World Cup have already been discovered.

See the report at:

http://www.symantec.com/content/en/us/enterprise/other_resources/b-cyber-security-trends-report-lamc.pdf

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UPDATE:
US defeats Ghana in opening match (despite cramping and a bash to the nose):
USA-Soccer-
Back to Five Thirty Eight – chances of a team advancing: U.S. at 63% (I think).  And, significantly, Brazil SPI now at 91.3.  (The commenters suggest the model does not favor a tie).

 

And now, Belgium:

Belgium is dangerous, but not as dangerous as tournament favorites Brazil, Germany and Argentina. Meanwhile, the Netherlands, France, Chile and Colombia also look more threatening than Belgium based on the things SPI looks at: pre-tournament resumes, form so far in the World Cup and, in the case of Chile and Colombia, games closer to home.

Our match-prediction algorithm gives the U.S. about a 42 percent chance of winning a knockout-stage game against Belgium based on each team’s SPI rating as of Thursday morning.

http://fivethirtyeight.com/datalab/the-u-s-s-odds-of-beating-belgium-and-every-other-world-cup-opponent/


UPDATE:

So, by now, we know the real SPI belongs to Germany.  Cool graphic re: Twitter traffic during World Cup Final:

http://cartodb.com/v/worldcup/match/?TC=x&vis=30acae6a-0a51-11e4-8918-0e73339ffa50&h=t&t=Germany,B40903%7CArgentina,5CA2D1&m=7%2F13%2F2014%2016:00:00%20GMT,7%2F12%2F2014%2018:35:00GMT&g=147%7C#/2/-11.7/-8.4/0

FiveThirtyEight’s revised analysis:

Germany didn’t begin the World Cup as the favorite. That honor belonged to (ahem) Brazil. But that’s a slightly deceptive measure. This was a top-heavy World Cup; not only Brazil but also Germany, Argentina and Spain would have been the front-runners in many past editions of the tournament.

By the end of the World Cup, Germany left little doubt it is the best team in the world. In fact, it may be the best national soccer team ever assembled.

http://fivethirtyeight.com/datalab/germany-may-be-the-best-national-soccer-team-ever/